Knowledge

Media: Book

book

Norden Rundt – Dampskibsselskabet Norden 1871-2021

Iversen, Martin Jes

In 2021 DS Norden celebrated its 150 years anniversary. In this book Martin Jes Iversen is analyzing the history of the shipping company which is one of the oldest in Denmark. In the first 50 years after being founded in 1871, Norden was a pioneer firm in Danish shipping. This period was followed by five decades of financial stability and gradual stagnation. But in the early 1990s the firm started its journey to become one of the leading firms in the global dry-bulk market. As the world experienced technological, economical and political changes, Norden would also change. Some of these changes were incremental. Others were more abrupt. But they were never predictable.

Lindhardt & Ringhof / 2021
Go to book
book

Pragmatic Spaces and the Maritime Security Agenda

Bueger, Christian

The oceans are increasingly understood as a security space. Does the new maritime security agenda lead to new spatial configurations? This chapter introduces the concept of ‘pragmatic spaces’ to explore spatial configurations produced in responses to maritime security. Four exemplary spaces are discussed: how counter-piracy led to the development of high risk areas, how maritime security capacity building produced new regions constructed through codes of conduct, how the identification of smuggling routes established new forms of international partnerships, and how maritime domain awareness systems advance new transnational spaces of surveillance. These new spatial configurations were introduced to manage maritime security issues and enable transnational forms of governance.

Book chapter in in J Anderson, A Davies, K Peters & P Steinberg (eds), The Handbook of Ocean Space. Routledge. / 2021
Go to book
book

Maritime Transport and the Environment: Energy Transport by Sea

Stanescu, Catalin Gabriel; Martinez Romera, Beatriz
Book chapter in in MM Roggenkamp, KJ de Graaf & RC Fleming (eds), Energy Law, Climate Change and the Environment / 2021
Go to book
book

Societal impact of climate change and new Arctic shipping routes on shipping in Greenland

Jakobsen, Uffe

According to the narratives transmitted through media and political discourse, climate change reduces the ice coverage in the Arctic and enhances shipping and other forms of maritime activities. Especially, expectations of an increasing level of transit shipping between Asian, especially Chinese, ports and ports in Europe and North America is dominant. Evidence, however, tells that the numbers of transit shipping through the Arctic Ocean are very limited, and dominated by European shipping companies. For Greenland, political expectations have also been high, since Greenland has been seen as "strategically" situated in relation to new shipping routes in the Arctic, But, again, the actual development has been moderate and not related to international transits but conditions in Greenland itself.

Institut d'Études de Géopolitique Appliquée / 2021
Go to book
book

Is There a Case for State Ownership in Ports and Shipping?

De Langen, Peter; Sornn-Friese, Henrik

This chapter assesses the role of state-owned enterprises (SOEs) in ports and shipping. Insights from regulatory economics are used to identify industry characteristics under which the SOE model is expected to be effective. With the use of these insights, characteristics of ports, terminals and shipping services that may lead to the establishment of SOEs are identified. The empirical overview of SOEs in shipping and ports shows a rather large use of SOEs, especially in container terminal operations and port development. The use of SOEs particularly in port development can be well understood with insights from regulatory economics. The majority of SOEs in ports, terminals and shipping are active internationally. This raises important additional research questions, most importantly regarding the strategic rationale of SOE internationalization and the role of geopolitical considerations in international activities.

Book chapter in G. Wilmsmeier, & J. Monios (Eds.), Geographies of Maritime Transport: Transport, Mobilities and Spatial Change / 2020
Go to book
book

The future of maritime transport

Psaraftis, Harilaos N.

Maritime transport carries around 80% of the world’s trade. It is key to the economic development of many countries, it is a source of income in many countries, and it is considered as a safe and environment friendly mode of transport. Given its undisputed importance, a question is what does the future hold for maritime transport. This chapter is an attempt to answer this question by mainly addressing the drive to decarbonize shipping, along with related challenges as regards alternative low carbon or zero carbon marine fuels. The important role of maritime policy making as a main driver for change is also discussed. Specifically, if maritime transport is to drastically change so as to meet carbon emissions reduction targets, the chapter argues, among other things, that a substantial bunker levy would be the best (or maybe the only) way to induce technological changes in the long run and logistical measures (such as slow steaming) in the short run. In the
long run this would lead to changes in the global fleet towards vessels and technologies that are more energy efficient, more economically viable and less dependent on fossil fuels than those today. In that sense, it would have the potential to drastically alter the face of maritime transport in the future. However, as things stand, and mainly for political reasons, the chapter also argues that the adoption of such a measure is considered as rather unlikely.

Book chapter in Encyclopedia of Transportation Elsevier / 2020
Go to book
book

Maritime insecurities

Bueger, Christian; Larsen, Jessica

This chapter provides first a discussion of how maritime security has been conceptualized and theorized and how the field has evolved. It discusses the more particular debates on dedicated maritime security issues: piracy, terrorism, smuggling, environmental crimes and the protection of critical maritime infrastructure. Although the oceans have featured occasionally in the literature on security, peace and development, it is fair to say that for decades scholars were suffering from what some have referred to as collective ‘seablindness’. A range of maritime insecurities have been extensively analysed. These include piracy; terrorism; various forms of smuggling; environmental crimes, hereunder illegal fishing; as well as a nascent literature on maritime critical infrastructures. With ongoing crises in different parts of the world’s oceans, maritime insecurity will continue to be recognized as one of the core dimensions of violence and insecurity. Maritime security also needs to be seen in the context of other international policy areas.

Book chapter in in B Osler Hampson, A Õzerdem & J Kent (eds), Routledge handbook of Peace, Security and Development / 2020
Go to book
book

Autonomous ships and product liability under the EU directive

Ulfbeck, Vibe Garf

Given the move toward automation, an increased focus on the liability for technical defects must be anticipated. This brings into play liability regimes that have traditionally been less used in the maritime area. One of these liability regimes is product liability. It is the purpose of this contribution to examine the implications of product liability rules in the maritime area, seen in light of the automation of ships.

Book chapter in H Ringbom, ER & TS (eds), Autonomous Ships and the Law. Routledge / 2020
Go to book
book

‘Containerization in Globalization’: A Case Study of How Maersk Line Became a Transnational Company

Sornn-Friese, Henrik

This chapter is a historical case study of Maersk Line, the world’s leading container carrier. Maersk Line’s global leadership was achieved within a relatively short time period and was the result of Mærsk Mc-Kinney Møllers decision in 1973 to enter container shipping—the biggest investment in the history of the AP Moller companies. When Maersk Line managed to achieve global leadership in a period of just about 25 years, the company’s own country offices were particularly important. They allowed the interconnection of three types of networks: The physical network of ships and routes, the digital network of information and communication systems and the human network of Maersk employees. The interaction between the vessels, the systems and the people is still at the core of the company today and central to its continued development.

Book chapter in N. P. Petersson, S. Tenold, & N. White (Eds.), Shipping and Globalization in the Post-War Era: Contexts, Companies, Connections / 2019
Go to book
book

Ports and the Circular Economy

De Langen, Peter; Sornn-Friese, Henrik

The ongoing shift toward a circular economy, in which end-of-life (EOL) products are reused, remanufactured, or recycled, has major implications for seaports, especially seaports in metropolitan areas, as in such areas, huge amounts of EOL products are available. Ports are therefore relevant locations for circular economy activities. This chapter identifies the main commodities in volume terms and the set of associated activities and assesses resulting opportunities and threats for ports. Case studies of Dutch ports are used to illustrate this analysis.

Book chapter in R. Bergqvist, & J. Monios (Eds.), Green Ports: Inland and Seaside Sustainable Transportation Strategies / 2019
Go to book